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Course Description

H 101, 102 THE WESTERN HERITAGE I, II (3, 3)
A survey of Western, essentially European, institutions, culture, religions, and ideologies from the Paleolithic era until about 1945. The course also attempts to show how history is not simply a body of knowledge but also a way of thinking. The first semester covers the topic from the Paleolithic era until 1789, and the second from 1789 until approximately 1945. (H 101, Fall; H 102, Spring)

H 107, 108 WORLD GEOGRAPHY: A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE (3, 3)
This course is a two-semester survey of world historical geography designed to demonstrate how history has often turned on geographic circumstances and to show how history and geography have interacted to help determine present-day ways of life.

H 107 concentrates on developed nations, while H 108 is given over to an analysis of undeveloped and developing areas. While emphasizing historical development within geographic contexts, the course also includes the economic, cultural, and geologic forces that make geography an essential discipline for understanding human potential and limitations. As it shows how humanity has exploited and often damaged its environment, the course also tries to show the necessity of worldwide ecological responsibility. (H 107, Fall; H 108, Spring)

H 204, 205 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES I, II (3, 3)
A broad survey of the United States from colonial times to the present, including aspects of American political, economic, social, and cultural development. Familiarity with and understanding of the major and conflicting interpretations of American history is also expected. (H 204, Fall; H 205, Spring)

H 310, 311 HISTORY OF MODERN EUROPE I, II (3, 3)
An historical analysis of European politics, culture, and society from the Renaissance to the present, as well as a study of the ways that historians have attempted to interpret the events and movements of the period. Fall semester: Renaissance to the French Revolution. Spring semester: The French Revolution to the present. Prerequisite: H102. (H 310, Fall; H 311, Spring)

H 341, 342 HISTORY OF THE SOUTH I, II (3, 3)
A study of the economic, cultural, social, and political development of the American South from the Jamestown settlement to the present, with particular emphasis on the origin and continuity of Southern distinctiveness, slavery, the plantation economy and society of the Old South, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and the origin and progress of the New South. (H 341, Fall; H 342, Spring; alternate years)

 
 

H 345, 346 SOCIAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES I, II (3, 3) A survey of American life and thought emphasizing the origin and evolution of American ideas, practices, and institutions, with specific reference to immigration, social reform movements, religion, education, science, literature, and the arts. Particular attention will be given to the complex interaction between forces of social cohesion and social conflict caused by the rapid social change resulting from urbanization and industrialization. (H 345, Fall; H 346, Spring; alternate years)

H 401, 402 HISTORY OF ENGLAND I, II (3,3)
H 401 examines the development of English political, social, cultural, and religious institutions from 1215 to 1688. H 402 examines the development of England from 1688 through the Cold War. The course will also focus on the political careers of Pitt, Gladstone, Disraeli, Churchill, and others. (H 401, Fall; H 402, Spring; alternate years)

H 435 HISTORY OF TENNESSEE (3)
The political, social, and economic history of Tennessee from the earliest settlement until the present. (On demand.)

H 461r SEMINAR IN HISTORY (3)
An intensive study of selected topics in history, including research in the materials of history and the writing of analytical reports. May be repeated for credit. At least one seminar is offered each semester. Topics change on a rotating schedule and include the Second World War, the Cold War, the Vietnam War, the Arts in Modern European History, the Protestant Reformation, Science and Religion in European and American History, Chinese Historical Biography, and the Civil War. (Fall, Spring)

H 481 HISTORY OF RUSSIA FROM ANCIENT RUSSIA TO PETER THE GREAT (3) This, the first half of a survey of Russian history, concerns the founding of ancient Russia to the accession of Peter the Great. The course will cover the coming of the Mongols, then the rise of the political center of Kiev, Novgorad, and Moscow, the unification of “Great Russia,” and the establishment of the Romanov dynasty. (Alternate years)

H 482 RUSSIAN HISTORY FROM MID-SEVENTEENTH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT (3) The second half of a survey of Russian history, H 482 concerns the rise of the Imperial Russia of Peter the Great and Catherine II, Russian expansionism, political and economic reforms, the revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Stalinism, and the fall of Russian Communism. (Alternate years)