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Course Descriptions

A 101 DRAWING I (3)
A beginning drawing class open to students at all levels. Students will learn the basic techniques of drawing using a variety of dry media. Emphasis will be on developing creativity and individual styles. Students will be responsible for providing their own materials for out of class assignments. (Fall)

A 103 PAINTING I (3)
A studio class providing experience in painting oil or acrylic media on canvas or other surfaces. Emphasis will be on composition and individual creativity. (Fall)

A 106 INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC DESIGN
Students learn and apply fundamentals of various software applications (such as Illustrator and Photoshop), web design, image editing, drawing and graphic animation.

A 111 ART APPRECIATION (3)
An introduction to the wide range of styles, materials, and techniques in art with desired focus on appreciation. The course will investigate the flow of art and cultural ideas throughout western civilization. (Spring)

A 201 DRAWING II (3)
A continuation of Art 101, with increased difficulty in terms of complexity, content, and expectations. Students will experiment with advanced techniques of drawing using a variety of dry media. Emphasis will be on developing creativity and personal styles. Individual projects and independent studies will be assigned based on students’ interests and goals. Prerequisite: A 101 (Spring)

A 203 PAINTING II (3)
A continuation of A 103 with an emphasis on the development of a particular theme explored throughout the course. Prerequisite: A 103 (Spring)

A 211 RELIEF PRINTMAKING (3)
An introduction to the printmaking process with emphasis on relief techniques, collography, and photomontage. Lab fee. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in visual art. (Fall, alternate years)

A 212 SCREEN PRINTING (3)
This course is an exploration of basic screen printing techniques with emphasis on preparing screen-process stencils, drawing fluid, color registration, and photo emulsion processes. Students will develop a series of single, and multiple colored-run edition prints. Students are encouraged to investigate their own interests using critical thinking through image making. Lab fee. (Spring, alternate years)

A 215 THE ART OF RECYCLING (3)
Students will be required to use recycled materials for their medium. The artworks created must be made from at least 70% recycled or reused materials. These works must be well crafted, with their “past lives” taken into consideration. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in visual art. (Spring, alternate years)

 
 

A 216 2-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (3)
A fundamental, non-computer studio course designed to introduce students to the basic visual concepts necessary in creating graphic designs on a two-dimensional surface. Includes color theory and composition. (Spring, alternate years)

A 317 3-D DESIGN (3)
An overview and exploration of the principles of design common to both aesthetic and utilitarian objects. Prerequisites: 2-D design or Drawing I (Fall, alternate years)

A 219 SCULPTURE I (3)
Students will explore various “low-tech” methods of creating three-dimensional art including technique, form, and content in successful sculpture, both traditional and contemporary. (Fall, alternate years)

A 286 INDEPENDENT/INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY (3)
Students pursue topics of their choice in a variety of areas such as design, history, film, special medium, etc. or a specific medium under the guidance of the instructor. Each student will submit a proposal to the appropriate department and faculty member for approval prior to registering for the class. Prerequisites: 12 visual art credit hours. (Fall, Spring)

A 300 ART SINCE 1900 (3)
Art styles and artists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries will be studied. Four research papers will be written on individually chosen topics. (Spring, alternate years)

A 308 SKETCHBOOK TRANSFORMATION (3)
This course will examine the transformation possibilities inherent in books. Sketchbooks/ journals will be created (varying themes) with consideration given to the book’s shape, construction, and history. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in visual art. (Spring, alternate years)

A 311 INTERMEDIATE STUDIO METHODS (3)
Individual studio work concentrating on investigation in artistic medium, ideas, and format. Self, peer, and instructor’s evaluation of goals, artistic achievement, and defense of work. Prerequisite: 9 credit hours in visual art. (Fall, Spring)

A 312 INTERMEDIATE STUDIO CRITIQUE (3)
Individualized instruction in practical fine art studio operations aimed at enhancement of the student’s artistic production and quality craftsmanship. Prerequisite: 9 credit hours in visual art. (Fall, Spring)

A 319 SCULPTURE II (3)
An extensive look at the technique, form, and content of sculpture with emphasis in both traditional and contemporary methods. Prerequisite: A 219 (Spring, alternate years)

 
 

A 370 ADVANCED STUDIO METHODS (3)
A continuation of Intermediate Studio Methods with an advanced focus on the conceptualization of individual art projects. Prerequisite: A 311 (Fall, Spring)

A 371 ADVANCED STUDIO CRITIQUE (3)
A continuation of Intermediate Studio Critique with individual studio space provided for developing advanced art projects in a medium of the student’s choice. Prerequisite: A 312 (Fall, Spring)

A 380 RESEARCH IN ART (3)
Significant literary research on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Review and evaluation include colloquy with departmental faculty and/or essay. Offered on demand as an independent study.
Prerequisite: 9 credit hours in visual art and permission of the instructor. (Spring, alternate years)

A 391 ART PRACTICUM (1-3)
Practical experience in design, advertising, manufacturing, and other commercial applications. In settings both on and off campus the student will become familiar with the use of art to create a product or provide a service. Open to junior and senior level students only. Offered on demand. Prerequisite: 9 visual art credit hours and permission of the instructor. (Fall, Spring)

A 495 SENIOR PROJECT (3)
The preparation of a permanent portfolio of college level works of art and exhibition along with the artist’s statement of purpose of selected works for general public viewing. Prerequisites: Senior status and 21 visual art credit hours. (Fall)

A 496 SENIOR THESIS (3)
Each graduating senior’s art work will be displayed in a public exhibition during the final month prior to graduation. Faculty reviews will be given to each artist, and a written statement concerning the body of work will be required of each student. Prerequisite: 21 visual art credit hours. (Spring)

MU 100 APPLIED MUSIC (1-3)
Private instruction for beginning students interested in developing applied performance skills. Students will learn the basic psychomotor skills and cognitive thought processes necessary for performance in their medium. Entry level will be assessed and the degree of progress carefully monitored to determine whether the student should be allowed to register for the course the following term. The course is open to all students with permission of the instructor. MU 100r may satisfy requirements as the secondary applied area for the music major. However, it may not be used to satisfy any requirements for the principal performance area. (Fall, Spring)

MU 103r APPLIED MUSIC (1-3)
Applied instruction in voice, piano, organ, guitar, and orchestral instruments with emphasis on learning appropriate techniques and literature for the voice or instrument being studied. Music majors may apply no more than 12 hours of credit in any one applied area toward a degree. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (Fall, Spring)

MU 108 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC FUNDAMENTALS (3)
A study of the rudiments of musical theory. Credit may not be used toward a major in music. (Fall)

MU 111 MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES OF MUSIC I (3)
A study of the four-part harmony and harmonic progression techniques used in the eighteenth century and an introduction to seventh chords and modulation. Part writing and analysis are stressed.

MU 111L MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES OF MUSIC I LAB (1)
An introduction to singing and hearing simple rhythms, scales, intervals, and triads. (Spring)

MU 112 MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES OF MUSIC II (3)
A continuation of MU 111 with emphasis on secondary dominants, two-part and three-part forms, American popular songs, and jazz forms. Prerequisite: Proficiency in the content of MU 111. (Fall)

MU 112L MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES OF MUSIC II LAB (1)
A continuation of MU 111L. Prerequisite: Proficiency in the content of MU 111L. (Fall)

MU 116 CLASS VOICE (1)
Repeatable for up to four hours of credit. Class and private instruction for beginning and other students interested in functional and applied singing skills. Entry level will be assessed and the degree of progress carefully monitored to determine whether the student should be allowed to register for the course the following term. Open to all students with the permission of the instructor. (Fall, Spring)

 
 

MU 161 COLLEGE BAND (1)
An organization open to all qualified students in the College on the approval of the director. Literature may include all styles of music, including jazz and popular. Music majors who have a wind or percussion instrument as their applied area may receive no more than six hours of credit toward their degree. (Fall and Spring as enrollment permits)

MU 171 CHORALE (1)
A small vocal ensemble open to all qualified students through audition and approval of the director. Literature is primarily focused on chamber music of the Renaissance and early Baroque, but also may include popular, jazz, folk, and other classical styles. Several public performances will be given each year both on and off the campus, with tours usually taken every year. Instrumentalists who wish to accompany this group may apply. Music majors who have selected piano or voice as their applied area may receive no more than six hours of credit toward their degree. (Fall, Spring)

MU 181 VOX HUMANA (1)
Open to all qualified students in the College on the approval of the instructor. Ensembles could be composed of various voice, keyboard, guitar, or orchestral instrument groups. Music majors may receive no more than six hours of credit toward their degree. (Fall, Spring)

MU 191 CONCERT CHOIR (1)
The Concert Choir is a select group of men and women admitted through audition. In addition to concerts performed at the College and in the community, the choir tours extensively, appearing in churches, schools, and on radio and television. Open to all students. Music majors who have selected piano or voice as their applied area may receive no more than six hours of credit in this course toward their degree. (Fall, Spring)

MU 207 MUSIC APPRECIATION (3)
For the student interested in developing an appreciation of music from the structural and historical points of view. The course includes an examination of the elements of music, repetition, form, mediums, and style characteristics from 1450 to the present. Credit may not be used toward a major in music. (Fall, Spring)

MU 208 THE CREATIVE PROCESS IN ART AND MUSIC (3)
A study to develop an appreciation for and understanding of the creative process in art and music. The emphasis is on expressing ideas through the use of art and music, relating the arts to each other and other subjects, and involvement in the creative process. (Fall)

MU 211 MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES OF MUSIC III (3)
A study of counterpoint; the fugue; variation techniques; borrowed chords; ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords; and altered chords. Prerequisite: Proficiency in the content of MU 112. (Spring)

 
 

MU 211L MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES OF MUSIC III LAB (1)
A continuation of MU 112L, with emphasis on triads, seventh chords, melodic dictation, and harmonic dictation. Prerequisite: Proficiency in the content of MU 112L. (Spring)

MU 212 MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES OF MUSIC IV (3)
A continuation of MU 211, with emphasis on altered chords, sonata allegro form, rondo form, and other late nineteenth and twentieth-century compositional techniques. Prerequisite: Proficiency in the content of MU 211. (Fall)

MU 212L MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES OF MUSIC IV LAB (1)
A continuation of MU 211L, with emphasis on melodic and harmonic dictation, altered chords, chromaticism, and other twentieth-century techniques. Prerequisite: Proficiency in the content of MU 211L. (Fall)

MU 214 MUSIC LITERATURE I (3)
The student will be introduced to the basic elements of music and terminology used in examining and conversing about music. Performance media, including vocal and instrumental, will be studied as they relate to history and the present day. Beginning with the Middle Ages and progressing through the Classical Period the student will study composers, major musical works, and compositional forms. The study of musical works will be both visual and aural. (Fall)

MU 215 MUSIC LITERATURE II (3)
This course is a continuation of MU 214, Music Literature I. Beginning with the Romantic Period and progressing through the Twentieth Century the student will study composers, major musical works, and compositional forms. Both visual and aural study will be incorporated in the examination of musical works. Jazz, the American Musical, Rock and Nonwestern Music will be components of the course. (Spring)

MU 219 PERFORMANCE & INSTRUMENTATION FOR PERCUSSION AND BRASS (2)
A study of instruments in the percussion family. The snare drum will be the main instrument of study, and emphasis will be placed on strengthening the student’s reading and performance of rhythmic notation. Students will discover through analysis how composers have scored for percussion instruments and how to apply basic principles of instrumentation. A study of instruments in the brass family. The trumpet and trombone will be the main instruments of study. Students will discover through analysis how composers have scored for brass instruments and how to apply basic principles of instrumentation. (Spring)

MU 220 PERFORMANCE & INSTRUMENTATION FOR STRING/WOODWINDS (2) A study of instruments in the string family. The violin and cello will be the main instruments of study. Students will discover through analysis how composers have scored for string instruments and how to apply basic principles of instrumentation. A study of instruments in the woodwind family. The flute and clarinet will be the main instruments of study. Students will discover through analysis how composers have scored for woodwind instruments and how to apply basic principles of instrumentation. (Fall)

MU 303 APPLIED MUSIC (1-3)
Applied instruction in voice, piano, organ, guitar, and orchestral instruments, with emphasis on learning appropriate techniques and literature for the voice or instrument being studied. Music majors must earn at least three hours in this course toward their degree. Prerequisite: Proficiency audition. (Fall, Spring)

MU 310 MUSIC IN THE CHURCH (2)
A study of the philosophy and objectives of the church music program. Topics will include personnel involved in the program, the music budget, the music library, the rehearsal room, instrumental music, and acoustics. (On demand)

MU 314, 315 HISTORY OF MUSIC I, II (3, 3)
A survey of stylistic periods in music history from the primitive origins to the developments of the twentieth century. Analysis of the formal elements of style, especially as they relate to the performance of music, will be a major emphasis. Special attention will be given to the aural comprehension of stylistic characteristics. Prerequisites for MU 314: MU 214 and MU 215; Prerequisite for MU 315: MU 314 (MU 314 Fall, MU 315 Spring)

MU 324 BEGINNING CONDUCTING (3)
A study of the basic techniques of conducting, including use of the baton, expressive gestures, clefs and transposition, and principles of orchestral, band, and choral core reading. Prerequisite: MU 112 or permission of the instructor (Fall)

MU 325 ADVANCED CONDUCTING AND CHORAL TECHNIQUES (3)
A study of more advanced conducting techniques, including recitative and operatic conducting, with an emphasis on choral ensembles. The choral topics will include intonation, tone production, balance, diction, style, repertory, rehearsal techniques, and organization as they apply to school, church, and civic choral organizations. Prerequisite: MU 324 (Spring)

MU 329 METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR TEACHING MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (2)
The study of music teaching methods and materials and the role of the music teacher in the elementary school. Twenty hours of field experience required. Prerequisite: ED 201 (Spring)

MU 332 METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR TEACHING GENERAL MUSIC IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2)
A study of the principles, procedures, and materials for teaching general music and other non-performing music classes in the middle or secondary school. Special emphasis is placed on the methods and materials for teaching the changing voice, and the role of the music teacher in grades 6-12. Twenty hours of field experience required. Prerequisite: ED 201 (Spring) 

MU 361 COLLEGE BAND (1)
An organization open to all qualified students in the college on the approval of the director. Literature may include all styles of music, including jazz and popular. Music majors who select a wind or percussion instrument as their applied area must earn at least two hours of credit. Prerequisite: At least four hours of MU 161r (Fall and Spring as enrollment permits)

MU 371 CHORALE (1)
A small vocal ensemble open to all qualified students through audition and approval of the director. Literature is primarily focused on chamber music of the Renaissance and early Baroque, but also may include popular, jazz, folk, and other classical styles. Several public performances will be given each year both on and off the campus, with tours usually taken every year. Instrumentalists who wish to accompany this group may apply. Music majors who have selected piano or voice as their applied area may receive no more than six hours of credit toward their degree. (Fall, Spring)

MU 381 VOX HUMANA (1)
Open to all qualified students in the College on the approval of the instructor. Ensembles could be composed of various voice, keyboard, guitar, or orchestral instrument groups. Prerequisite: At least four hours of MU 181r (Fall, Spring)

MU 391 CONCERT CHOIR (1)
The Concert Choir is a select group of men and women admitted through audition. In addition to concerts performed at the college and in the community, the choir tours extensively, appearing in churches, schools, and on radio and television. Music majors who select piano or voice as their applied area must earn at least two hours of credit. Prerequisite: At least four hours of MU 191r (Fall, Spring)

MU 404 RECITAL (2-3)
Advanced applied instruction in voice, piano, organ, guitar, and orchestral instruments, with emphasis on developing appropriate techniques for literature being prepared for public performance. The course is an extension of MU 303r, Applied Music, in the student’s principal area of performance. Music majors seeking the BA degree must earn five hours of credit. Music majors seeking the BME degree must earn two hours of credit. Prerequisite: Proficiency audition (Fall, Spring)

MU 430 MUSIC TEACHING AND LEARNING (2)
The study of the history of music education in the United States and its philosophical and psychological foundations. Students examine the psychology of learning, curriculum development, measurement and evaluation, research, and classroom management styles in the field of music education. They also examine music teaching as a profession and the special learner in the classroom. Twenty hours of field experience required. Prerequisites: ED 110, ED 201 (Fall)

 MU 440 MUSIC SEMINAR (1)

This course functions as a capstone experience for all senior music majors. A substantial portion of the course consists of an integrated review of music theory and music history. For students preparing to teach, music education and conducting techniques are included. Specific topics and learning methods are structured for the individual student. (Fall, Spring)

TH 100/200/300/400 THEATRE PRACTICUM (1)
This course is a practical, experiential class and is designed to give students practical experience as a member of a theatrical production team. Students are assigned a position on one or more of the following crews: set construction, props, costume, sound, lights, set design, acting, directing, or management. A time commitment of a minimum of three hours per week (or a total of 45 hours per semester) is required. It may be repeated twice each academic year for a total of 8 hours elective credit. Six of those hours can be applied to a minor in theatre. Students in acting or directing classes make a time commitment of 3 hours per night for a six-week period, with additional time required for line and blocking rehearsals and memorization. (Fall, Spring)

TH 101 BASIC THEATRE TECHNIQUE (3)
An introduction to the principles, theories, and skills of design; emphasis on script analysis, formation of concepts, and use of design elements and principles within a collaborative process in the areas of management, scene design, set construction, sound, makeup, and costuming. The student will learn theoretical and practical knowledge of the various technical aspects of a working theatrical production. Practical laboratory work is required on the play in production. This is a general overview course that covers the visual design and production elements of theatrical production. (Fall and Spring with instructor approval)

TH 104 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE (3)
This course is designed to introduce the undergraduate student to the practice of the artists in the theatre; to heighten awareness of the theatre as a long established fine art form; to aid the student in developing an awareness of the aesthetic and intellectual values to be obtained through the study of the art of theatre (literature, form, style, artists); to encourage students to be both more eager and discriminating theatre goers; and to experience the art form in both a passive and active way. Attendance at two live performances is required. (Fall)

 
 

TH 201 INTRODUCTION TO ACTING (3)
The class will be an introduction to the fundamental concepts of the art of acting. It will explore the physical, emotional, and analytical process of creating character. Character objectives, motivations, and actions will be studied through script and practical interpretation. Preparation of scenes for class presentation is required. (With instructor’s approval)

TH 204 SCRIPT ANALYSIS (3)
This class discusses the fundamentals of reading a script for practical purposes...that is, to act in them, design them, and direct them. The course will introduce methods for analyzing how a script works in order to best determine what a script means, or can mean, to an audience. Students will come to understand the script as a blueprint for a finished product (production), and not as a finished product in itself (literature).

TH 209 WORLD THEATRE HISTORY I (3)
This course examines the history, social impact, criticism, and influence of theatre as a collaborative art form. In the course of the semester students will explore the nature of dramatic performance and literature since prehistory, develop a deeper understanding of theatre from prehistory to the present, learn the context and impact of historically significant plays, explore the fecundity and variety of theatre in world cultures, and develop and cogently express critical evaluation of theatre as history, literature, and art.

TH 301 DRAMATIC LITERATURE (3)
Analytical and critical study of dramatic literature, with attention paid to genre, literary movements, and historical context. Extensive reading of primary works , and a term paper will be required. Also listed as E 301

TH 304 ADVANCED ACTING (3)
This course is an introduction to a natural acting process. Students will do exercises in relaxation, concentration, sensory awareness, improvisation, and playing an action. There are six performances by each student to put theory into practice.

TH 309 WORLD THEATRE HISTORY II (3)
This course examines the history, social impact, criticism, and influence of theatre as a collaborative art form. In the course of the semester students will explore the nature of dramatic performance and literature since the Renaissance, develop a deeper understanding of theatre from the Renaissance to the present, learn the context and impact of historically significant plays, explore the fecundity and variety of theatre in world cultures, and develop and cogently express critical evaluation of theatre as history, literature, and art.

TH 401 DIRECTING THEATER (3)
Stage directing is designed to introduce a student to the process of selection, research, conception, casting, rehearsal, and staging of a play. This is a lecture-laboratory course designed to give the student theoretical knowledge and practical experience in theatre production and play directing. (With Instructor’s Approval)

TH 402 PLAYWRITING (3)
This course is an introduction to the art and craft of playwriting. Primary emphasis will be given to writing for the stage, requiring the student to understand the unique facets of stage performance and the art of writing theatrically. Conflict, dialogue, and dramatic devices and structures will be investigated in order to give the student the tools to tell a story that will engage a theatre audience. Finally, using these tools to write in other related media will be explored to broaden the student’s potential media for expression.

TH 404 THEATRE CAPSTONE PROJECT (3)
The Theatre emphasis capstone project is the culmination of four years work in the Department of Fine Arts’ Theatre program. The capstone is a fusion of practice and theory, including the supporting research necessary in any area of emphasis. Seniors produce a portfolio that may include multimedia aspects, archiving the capstone project from inception, through research and development, to final production and/or presentation. The portfolio will be defended in a 20-minute presentation to Fine Arts faculty, in addition to any performance piece(s) that may be part of the capstone project.