Skip to main content

Course Descriptions

E 100 ESSENTIAL COMPOSITION (3)
This course is designed for students whose writing skills need to be strengthened before they are ready to enroll in Composition I (E 101). Students are taught how to formulate a thesis and construct a well-organized, well-supported, and grammatically- proficient essay. This course will be composed of online study aids and classroom work. Satisfactory classroom performance, awarded as C- or above, and passing the final exam, as evaluated by a committee of English faculty, enable the student to qualify for E 101. Students who do not make a C- or above will receive the grade of NG and may sign up for the class again, up to three times, until they achieve a passing grade and can receive credit. (Fall, Spring)

E 101 COMPOSITION I (3)
This course involves the reading of essays from disciplines across the curriculum and emphasizes the writing process. Students write papers in various rhetorical modes. A documented paper is required. E 101 is prerequisite to all other English courses with the exception of E 308. Prerequisite: E 100 or an English sub score of 18 on the ACT or 450 on the Critical Reading portion of the SAT. (Fall, Spring)

E 102 COMPOSITION II (3)
Continuation of E 101 and an introduction to writing about literature: fiction, drama, and poetry. Research techniques are introduced, and the completion of a research paper is one of the requirements of the course. Prerequisites: E 101, E 102 is prerequisite to all literature courses. (Fall, Spring)

E 201 MASTERPIECES OF WORLD LITERATURE I (3)
A study of Western literature from the Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance periods. Extensive reading of primary works. Prerequisite: E 102 (Fall)

E 202 MASTERPIECES OF WORLD LITERATURE II (3)
A study of Western literature from the Neoclassical, Romantic, Realistic, and Modern periods. Extensive reading of primary works. Prerequisite: E 102 (Spring)

E 301 DRAMATIC LITERATURE (3)
Analytical and critical study of dramatic literature, with attention paid to genre, literary movements, and historical context. Extensive reading of primary works and a term paper will be required. Also listed as TH 301

E 308r LITERARY MAGAZINE (1)
The student enrolled in this course gains practical experience in writing, editing, and layout through work for the literary magazine. No prerequisite. Maximum credit: 3 hours. Does not fulfill an ACR. (Fall, Spring)

 
 

E 312 BOOKS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR CHILDREN (3)
This course promotes knowledge and use of books for children. Attention is given to choosing books and related materials (internet resources, magazines, films) for different age and ability levels as well as to integrating trade books into the curriculum. Prerequisite: E 102. Does not fulfill a literature requirement for the ACR. Also listed as LS 312. (Spring)

E 313 BOOKS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR ADOLESCENTS (3)
This course provides knowledge and use of books and related materials (films and magazines) for adolescents. Emphasis is placed on critical judgment in the evaluation, selection, and promotion of reading material for this age group. Prerequisite: E 102. Does not fulfill a literature requirement for the ACR. Also listed as LS 313. (Fall)

E 321 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3)
A consideration of the historical development of the English language from the Anglo- Saxon period to the present. Prerequisite: E 102. May be applied to the language but not the literature requirement of the ACR. (Spring)

E 322 ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND USAGE (3)
This course seeks to promote an awareness of the nature of language and its various aspects. Emphasis will be placed on a thorough review of traditional grammar, with some attention given to such areas as structural and transformational grammar, regional dialects, semantics, etymology, and phonology. Prerequisite: E 102. May be applied to the language but not the literature requirement of the ACR. (Fall, Summer)

E 336 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I (3)
Extensive reading of masterpieces of British Literature from the Anglo-Saxon through the Neoclassical periods. Prerequisite: E 102 (Fall)

E 337 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE II (3)
Involves extensive reading of masterpieces of British Literature from the Romantic through the Modern periods. Prerequisite: E 102 (Spring)

E 341 AMERICAN LITERATURE I: COLONIAL THROUGH AMERICAN RENAISSANCE (3) A study of the development of American literatures from the period of European colonization in the New World to the American Civil War. Prerequisite: E 102 (Fall)

E 342 AMERICAN LITERATURE II: REALISM TO MODERN (3)
A study of the development of American literatures from the end of the American Civil War to the present. Prerequisite: E 102 (Spring)

E 351r READINGS IN SHAKESPEARE (3)
Analytical and critical study of selected dramas by Shakespeare. May be repeated in consecutive years since different plays will be selected for study. Prerequisite: E 102 (Spring)

 
 

E 360 THE SHORT STORY AS GENRE (3)
This class offers a critical analysis of a wide variety of classic and contemporary short stories, from the roots of the genre in the U.S. in the 19th Century, through its growth and development in the U.S. and Europe, to its flowering across the globe in the late 20th Century and early 21st Centuries. Prerequisite: E 102 (Spring, even years)

E 370r CREATIVE WRITING (3)
In this course, students will study classic examples of poetry and fiction as well as write their own poems and stories. They will analyze literary models in these two genres as a basis for composing original work. Stress will be placed on writing in traditional forms with an eye toward creating works of literary merit. Extensive reading as well as writing (both critical and creative) is required. Does not fulfill an ACR but may be used as a 300-level (English) elective for any major. Prerequisite: E 102 (Fall, even years)

E 375 SCIENCE FICTION (3)
This course explores the genre of science fiction. The nature of science fiction and its reading protocols will be examined—what sets it apart from other types of literature. The readings, which are mostly short stories, will also trace the development of science fiction in the 20th century. A medium-length term paper that examines one or more novels is required. Prerequisite: E 102 (On demand)

E 405 ENGLISH SEMINAR (1)
This class functions as a capstone experience for all senior English majors seeking the B.A. and the B.S. without certification. This course serves to synthesize the knowledge the majors have gained throughout their course work since it will link formal elements of literature with historical contexts and history of genres. Writing and class discussion will apply overarching concepts, such as period, genre, form, and style, to particular literary passages, thus honing students’ analytical ability to connect the general to the particular. Permission of the instructor is required prior to enrollment, and a minimum grade point average of 2.5 in English classes is required. Does not fulfill an ACR. (Fall, Spring)

E 408r ENGLISH PRACTICUM (TUTORING) (1)
Under the supervision of a faculty member and using a variety of materials, the student will tutor in the Writing Center or in composition classes, helping other students needing remedial work. Maximum credit: 3 hours. Permission of the instructor is required prior to enrollment, and a minimum grade point average of 2.5 in English classes is required. Does not fulfill an ACR. ( Fall, Spring)

E 410r READINGS IN THE NOVEL (3)
Analytical and critical study of selected classics in the genre of the novel. May be repeated in consecutive years since different novels will be selected for study. Writing-intensive: seminar paper required. Open to English majors and minors with a minimum grade point average of 2.5 in English classes, Interdisciplinary majors, and others only with consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: E 102 (On demand)

 
 

E 420r SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE (3)
An advanced course of in-depth reading in one or more authors or particular periods of English, American, or World Literature. Includes substantial reading of primary texts supplemented by secondary texts. Writing-intensive: seminar paper required. Open to English majors and minors with a minimum grade point average of 2.5 in English classes, Interdisciplinary majors, and others only with consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: E 102 (Fall and/or Spring annually)

E 450 ARTHURIAN LEGENDS (3)
This course traces the development of Arthurian literature in the Middle Ages, from Celtic myth, folktales, and legends, to Latin chronicles, French and German romances centered on individual knights, and finally the great compilations of the French Vulgate cycle and Malory’s Morte D’Arthur. A research paper of substantial length is required. Open to English majors and minors with a minimum grade point average of 2.5 in English classes, Interdisciplinary majors, and others only with consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: E 102 (On demand)

E 475 TOLKIEN AND CRITICAL THEORY (3)
The course is both a reading of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings and an introduction to 20th century theories of interpretation. Over the course of the semester, we will read Tolkien’s novel and subject it to various methods of interpretation: formalist, psychoanalytic, feminist, etc. There are three kinds of reading assignments: the primary text is Tolkien’s novel, supplemented by selections from his letters; then there are explanations of theories of interpretation in an introductory book on critical theory; and finally, articles of literary criticism (on reserve in the library) which apply one or more methods of interpretation to the novel. A research paper of substantial length is required. Open to English majors and minors with a minimum grade point average of 2.5 in English classes, Interdisciplinary majors, and others only with consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: E 102 (On demand)

FRENCH (Courses must be taken sequentially.)

F 101 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I (3)
This course is a proficiency-based course designed to provide a functional elementary foundation in the basic skills speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French as well as an integrated study of French culture. (Fall, Summer on demand)

F 102 ELEMENTARY FRENCH II (3)
This course is a continuation of French 101. Prerequisite: F101 or the equivalent. (Spring, Summer on demand)

F 201 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I (3)
This course is a proficiency-based course designed to review essential structures in further detail and to improve the student’s ability in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French. Prerequisite: F 102 or the equivalent. (Fall, Summer on demand)

F 202 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II (3)
This course is a continuation of F 201 and is a proficiency-based course designed to review essential structures in further detail and to improve the student’s ability in speaking, listening, reading and writing in French. Prerequisite: F 201 or the equivalent. (Spring, Summer on demand)

F 301 ADVANCED FRENCH GRAMMAR AND CONVERSATION (3)
This course is designed to develop advanced oral comprehension skills and intermediate-to-high-level speaking proficiency in French. This course follows the 1999 ACTFL Speaking Proficiency Guidelines, using “post-intermediate lexicon building in addition to review and expansion of oral grammar elements that support conversation at the advanced level.” Prerequisite: F202 or the equivalent. This class is conducted in French. (Fall)

F 302 FRENCH COMPOSITION (3)
This course is a study and practicum of French composition, with a review and expansion of supporting grammatical structure. With the focus on writing for varied audiences and tasks, students will also practice oral French and structure as needed to enhance advanced-level writing tasks. This class is conducted in French. Prerequisite: F 301 or the equivalent. (Spring)

 
 

F 304 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE (3)
This is an introduction to the major literary periods and movements in France and the Francophone world. The course covers excerpts of texts taken from works of various authors from the major literary movements and periods in France and the Francophone world, such as medieval, renaissance, classicisme, romantisme, realisme, surrealisme, negritude, and nouvelle generation. This course will focus on excerpts from novels, poems, and dramatic works, through which we will study the forms and specifics of writing during those literary periods. The course, taught completely in French, will introduce the student not only to different aspects of literature, but also to literary analysis and criticism. Prerequisites: French 202 or the equivalent. This course will fulfill the literature requirement in the ACR.

F 305 FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE (3)
This course is a study of the social institutions and ways of life in present day France and the francophone world, focusing on cultural and linguistic identity as well as changing family structures and the challenges in increasingly multi-ethnic societies. Discussions are based on a variety of authentic sources: internet, books, reviews, recordings, and interviews. Aural/oral/reading and writing skills are emphasized. Prerequisites: French 302 or the equivalent. This course does not fulfill an ACR.

SPANISH (Spanish classes will be conducted entirely in Spanish from the first day of class. Courses must be taken sequentially.)

S 101 ELEMENTARY SPANISH I (3)
In this course, students will learn to greet formally and informally; express gender and agreement using simple sentences; convey ideas in present tense using some regular, irregular and stem-changing verbs; and have a first glance at Latin-American culture. This course will emphasize listening and speaking. (Fall, Summer)

S 102 ELEMENTARY SPANISH II (3)
In this course, students will learn to describe their daily routines and habits; compare objects or people; discuss food preferences; make plans to have fun; refer to past events; and learn more about Latin-American culture. This course will emphasize listening and speaking.
Prerequisite: S 101 or the equivalent. (Spring, Summer)

S 201 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I (3)
In this course, students will learn to communicate ideas in past, present, and future. Emphasis will be on speaking, but students will increase their reading and writing skills as well. Students will learn to make travel arrangements and request travel- related information; talk about their health and explain what part of the body hurts; describe professions and articulate future plans; express emotions; discuss technology; and relate what has happened in the near past.
Prerequisite: S 102 or the equivalent. (Fall, Summer on demand)

 
 

S 202 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II (3)
In this course, students will learn to communicate ideas in more specific stages of the past, present, and future. Emphasis will be on speaking, but students will increase their reading and writing skills as well. Students will learn to talk about means of communication such as newspaper, television, and radio; hypothesize; converse about music, art, and dance; relate what happened before another past action or event; discuss world problems and possible solutions; express political points of view; describe unplanned events; make excuses; and contrast ideas and descriptions. Prerequisite: S 201 or the equivalent. (Spring, Summer on demand)

S 301 ADVANCED SPANISH GRAMMAR AND CONVERSATION I (3)
In this course, the emphasis will be on interpersonal communication in Spanish about a broad range of topics. In preparation for this task, a succinct review of grammar will be tied to the group’s needs. Students will employ the other language skills of listening, writing, reading, and socio-cultural awareness in order to improve their conversational Spanish. Prerequisite: S 202 or the equivalent. (Fall)

S 302 ADVANCED SPANISH GRAMMAR AND CONVERSATION II (3)
In this course, students will communicate ideas in more specific stages of the past, present, and future while increasing exposure to authentic input from the Spanish language. This course will emphasize the four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing with the purpose of using Spanish for real-world purposes. Students will be able to deny and contradict; describe unknown and nonexistent people and things; link ideas; express time in the future; convey purpose; express uncertainity and condition; describe past desires; give advice; express doubts; talk about hypothetical situations in the future; discuss contrary-to-fact situations; discuss past actions affecting the present; talk about actions completed before other past actions; express a sequence of events in the present and future; express whether what was hoped or desired has happened; express whether what was hoped or desired would have happened; describe how things may be in the future; and talk about hypothetical situations in the past. Prerequisite: S 301 or the equivalent. (Spring)